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Equilor Facebook adFacebook social ads. Not easy as needs a different approach. I just found an inviting ad targeted to my profile whether I want to take a free voucher to Hungary’s one and only restaurant that has one Michelin star. I think everyone wants one. And this was not the usual spammy ‘you won a car/house/USD 1M/etc’ kind of message that was translated on a very bizarre way by an online translator service, rather a nicely crafted one with good Hungarian.

  The ad doesn’t say anymore about conditions or ways of taking the opportunity or other details that help me to decide whether this is for me or no. But when I click the landing page provides the conditions that might be relevant for a very specific target audience about private financial savings.

We should all be very careful with communicating our messages on Facebook. Facebook is not about awareness it is about engagement. On Facebook you may and should target your message very consciously. Otherwise you may get CTs but no conversions. On Facebook you shouldn’t focus on CTs.

Let’s make it clear: I find it very entertaining on Facebook (Hungarian), when it comes to duplications in inflection, wrong word order or mixed Hunglish sentences. That’s part of the game. We wanted our Hungarian version of Facebook, even myself have 15 winning phrases. We have been creating it for ourselves.

 

An example for a Facebook application English and Hungarian mix:

facebook_hunglish

 

 

But I’m afraid brand communication is different. A brand that has properties like: professional, one of the best quality available, innovative, etc. cannot allow negligence in communication that may harm the brand. Unless…

Unless what? Unless the company wants to associate a human insight to the brand. Accordingly, this is what Nike is doing with the new campaign. Building running communities by giving them a platform for racing. By this occurrence, once they integrate the campaign into community channels and use those resources well, language lameness would be part of the game. However, Nike is doing it on its own microsite, really by the reason of saving budget. They just don’t want to bother with small markets. So their lameness is a real one, a part of a bad quality web development that is not in harmony with Nike’s brand properties.

 

Nike’s branded Hunglish widget:

nike_widget 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This kind of global way of thinking is against today’s marketing trends. I mean personal experiences with the brand. For me, as a Hungarian, it tells me that Nike doesn’t think my engagement is important for them.

I just shot this banner. So professional, I wanted to show it anyway.

 

 

1. The big size cursor is a perfect attention grabber.
2. The simple direction is also perfect (Use the cover!) as you can do it normally one way.
3. The education message is the following after the user action: By this action you can save the amount of energy of cooking a dinner. – ain’t it… perfect?

I hope the advertiser will create a series of these type of engaging banners. I would be glad to get engaged and learn simple tricks of saving energy.

This is an issue… and not an easy one. I mean it looks quite simple, but if you want to find whose fault is that, it’s not an easy thing.

Check this banner, and count how many animation loops you need to be able to read the message:

 

 

It took three times for me to get the message coming through. In 18 seconds – this is the length of the video – the animation runs 3 times which means that the animation length of the banner is 6 seconds.

The issue is serious because:

  • There are many very skilled flash designers who develops anything you want. The problem is that they rarely know anything about adservers or marketing – so without directions or supervision they may create a colorful, very beautiful and completely useless banner.
  • There is a difference between online accounts and classic ones. Former one might miss marketing background but may know better what clicktag or filesize conditions are, while a classic account are more agile to notice spelling grammars or – like in our case – that she cannot read the message.
  • My experience shows that advertisers still pay less attention on online creative executions if there is an integrated campaign. That’s because they have less online experiences plus many times online creatives are adaptions of the offline creative so it should not be a big deal.

Anyhow, if you feel lost, or are unsure, take an old hand’s advice. For this issue, I have one I inherited from an old stager: To check the length of the appearance of any texts in animations, read it loud with normal speed. If you can read it, that’ll do.

If you expect explanations here, or arguments for utilizing gif banners, you will be disappointed. I don’t have any. Cheery content!

Why I raised this topic is that a professional player, who has been acting on this market for ages now placed an animated gif banner onto the most visited social networking portal two days ago. You can find such banners on small portals from advertisers that just began advertising online, but it is really strange from someone like them. So while I show you the banner here below, I also try to figure out what happened with them?!

 

[Click on the banner to see the animation]

 

My scenarios are:

1. The advertiser prepared flash and back-up gif banners, but they uploaded only the gif banner into the adserver by mistake.

2. They paid an animator to create a nice cartoon banner, but due to the economic crisis, they cut the budget meanwhile, therefore it couldn’t be finished, but as they invested they put it live.

3. They just came back from an american marketing course for small businesses and learned the newest trends of online marketing.

4. They are targeting to IT guys who eat pizzas, drink cola, check photos of colleagues on iWiW and block flash content.

Because Vodafone Hungary did. Professional work, by the way. One thing you should know about layers: It is always a challenge – ok these days it’s just getting better – placing a layer properly on a site that contains other embed – or flash content running. For some online media it is still an impossible question. Anyway, see how smoothly it runs on Vodafone Hungary’s own portal:

 


watching in full size is recommended

 

  • the dimensions of the flash are optimized for wide screens (that have lower heights) too
  • links work beneath the flash animation
  • the superbanner flash zone works together with the animation
  • the animation works properly under IE and Firefox too
  • the file size of the overlay is 62kb which is relatively small – runs weaker PCs too without problems.

This is a good example of banner combination and an overlay too. Well done!

This is not the ideal world as Seth thought, but it still worths a look. Raiffeisen has a TV program for educating people about financial phrases and facts. Many times, captchas are hard to read, so the message of the ad is built on it:

Isn’t that clear? Discernment in finance is crucial. Watch the TV program by Raiffeisen Bank.

Nicely done by the Advertiser as the sponsorship is clickable and directs to a video published on the portal of a TV channel. Even though I don’t think the copy of the ad is strong enough, the idea and the execution is very well done!

 

You buy (or arrange anyhow) one of the most expensive media space available online. You reach in one day 1/3rd of all local internet users. You have a superbanner plus a triplebanner at once that can be seen without rolling. What do you do?

 

 

CV Online has placed the same creative into the superbanner and the triplebanner. C’mon! They could have had a banner combination, they could have linked the two banners to each other. Once you have such a chance, you better think it twice how you use it!

This post is a sign of respect for those innovative advertisers and agencies who dare to shoot videos for online campaigns. I’ve already written about the poor tradition of placing TV copies into online creatives.

And I found something interesting in Unilever’s Knorr communication.

 

 

The conception is about publishing a series of videos of different recipes by Knorr. Knorr products support the snack culture for women: making cooking easy.

As people read less and less and online video consumption is growing like hell, building a conception on video content seems a good idea. The problem is the cost. Besides the production, a high capacity video streaming server (not for the website, rather for hosting the online creatives) costs a fortune, especially if the target audience is wide and we want wide reach and high frequency.

If you think though that the conception is fine but the execution of video content is childish with youngsters in vegetable costumes dancing, I agree. But maybe that is part of the conception and let’s believe that Unilever and McCann people are professional enough to double-check the creatives with target audience focus groups. They might find it amusing.

This post is not about about judging the creative itself anyway. Rather I wanted to encourage advertisers not to think only in TV copies if it comes to moving picture.

A small gag for the end. The 4th part of the Hungarian ‘American Idol’ called Megasztár will start this fall. The title of this Knorr series is Vegasztár reflecting to the hype of the Megasztár and the vegetables products contain. Sweet.

Since my fellow Hungarians translated Facebook to our language, I am really focused about how all the special Facebook language appears for me… and I’m enjoying it. Really. Good job!

I am also very pleased if I see a well-targeted social ad – in Hungarian. This time I show you a very-well positioned ad with a small mistake that makes it totally useless.

 

 

(For annotations please click on the video and watch it on Youtube original environment)

As you can see for yourself, they didn’t pay attention to define the click-through URL properly. Therefore the visitor is directed to the blog but may not find the content.

The good thing is that you may optimize the appearance in online campaigns anytime you find an error, somehow you cannot do in print/TV campaigns. The bad thing is that it’s Friday night and noone will take care of it until Monday.

Update: Bloggers work on the weekend too. Saturday afternoon I found the ad on Facebook working properly. That’s what I call vocation!